Naptime Nugget #45 - Improving Self-Control: It’s all about the buy-in!

Updated: Dec 22, 2019

At it's core, self-control is about being able to control your impulses in order to reach a goal. Imagine a friend is trying to get you to go for a run – she is training for a marathon and needs motivation and accountability. She has a goal. You would like to support her. Only issue? You do not like running. You are not running a marathon and have no interest. Do you go running? Likely not. Does she? Likely. What could she or he do to get you to go? Probably nothing.



Children are no different. They behave in ways that align with their own goals! If a toddler wants a can of pop that is within sight, they go after it! If a two-year old wants a toy, they take it. When a child gets a bit older, they may resist this toy-grabbing tendency, especially when they start to develop a different type goal - to make and keep friends. So, the question is, how do we help children learn to manage their behavior and strong impulses? Wee need to get them to buy in to the "why".


This video has three main ideas that are applied to three common challenges


*Clean up *Meal time *Learning time


In just 15 minutes, you will gain three main tips to increase the buy-in, get the behaviors you want (and decrease the behaviors you don't!) You will be able to apply these strategies to improved a child's self-control, giving them the skills needed to succeed - in your care, in school, and in life.

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https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVbxeqw6fZlApmqRY2Tnh6w

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